“I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” by William Wordsworth Poem and Analysis

Daffodils“I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” by William Wordsworth is a poem commonly known as “The Daffodils”. Let’s take a moment and go over a summary of the poem and then discuss it through a line-by-line analysis.

Summary

This poem is about the speaker who wanders throughout the land and comes upon a field of daffodils everywhere he goes. He feels great pleasure from it. Later, when the time has long gone, he thinks about the pleasure he felt while seeing it for the first time.

Analysis

Style: Four stanzas that are written in iambic tetra-meter with each stanza having the same rhyme scheme.
Theme: Being Alone
Tone: Joy
Rhyme scheme: ABABCC

Line-by-line Analysis and Figurative Language

    • I wandered lonely as a cloud / That floats on high o’er vales and hills, – The speaker walked around because he was lonely. Vales means valleys.
    • When all at once I saw a crowd, / A host, of golden daffodils; / Beside the lake, beneath the trees, / Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. – The speaker suddenly saw a field of daffodils moving in the wind.
    • Continuous as the stars that shine / And twinkle on the milky way, – Neverending
    • They stretched in never-ending line / Along the margin of a bay: – The went along the side of the bay.
    • Ten thousand saw I at a glance, / Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. – The speaker saw 10,000 with only a quick look. The daffodils swayed in the wind.
    • The waves beside them danced; but they / Out-did the sparkling waves in glee: – The waves were flowing yet the flowers moved more.
    • A poet could not but be gay, / In such a jocund company: – A poet can only be happy in such a happy place.
    • I gazed—and gazed—but little thought / What wealth the show to me had brought: – He looked but didn’t think. The scenery brought him great “wealth” – – joyfulness and memories.
    • For oft, when on my couch I lie / In vacant or in pensive mood, / They flash upon that inward eye / Which is the bliss of solitude; – Often times when the speaker is lying on his sofa alone, whether thinking deeply or without thought, the scenery of the daffodils comes to mind. And that is the happiness of being alone.
    • And then my heart with pleasure fills, / And dances with the daffodils. – after he thinks about the daffodils, he gets happy.

Poem: “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” by William Wordsworth

I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o’er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the milky way,
They stretched in never-ending line
Along the margin of a bay:
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

The waves beside them danced; but they
Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:
A poet could not but be gay,
In such a jocund company:
I gazed—and gazed—but little thought
What wealth the show to me had brought:

For oft, when on my couch I lie
In vacant or in pensive mood,
They flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.

Love Poetry: “Growth” by Gary R. Hess

Love poetry: Growth by Gary R Hess

“Growth” is a poem written for Valentine’s Day during the year 2018. Time has come and gone so quickly, and everything changes. There’s not much which can be said about the poem in terms of overall meaning. It speaks for itself. It is written in unrhymed meter.

Want to be romantic? Feel free to share this with your loved one. Write it on a card, print it out, or remember it and recite it during the perfect moment. Whatever you do, you can’t go wrong.(Continue reading…)

The Forgetten Poetry of Abraham Lincoln

Abraham LincolnDid you know Abraham Lincoln was a poet? He may be best known for his Gettysburg Address and winning the Civil War, but he should be also remembered as an avid reader and amateur poet. Reading these poems is a fantastic way to celebrate Lincoln’s birthday on February 12.

Like many of us, Lincoln began writing poetry as a teenager. This is one of his first poems:

Abraham Lincoln
his hand and pen
he will be good but
god knows When

It was written sometime between 15 and 17.(Continue reading…)

“A Visit from St. Nicholas” by Clement Clarke Moore Analysis and Poem

“A Visit from St. Nicholas” is one of the most read poems in history. Let’s take a look at a synopsis of this Christmas poem and an analysis of the figurative speech used, and then discuss the differences between various editions of the poem.

Synopsis of “A Vist from St. Nicholas”

Twas the Night Before Christmas book coverThis poem, commonly known as “Twas the Night Before Christmas” is attributed to Clement Clarke Moore under the title “A Visit from St. Nicholas”. However, there is some speculation that the poem was actually written by Henry Livingston, Jr. and is an ongoing controversy on who was the real author. The poem was written in 1822 and is now a holiday favorite.

This writing tells the now very well-known and followed tradition of Christmas in America with Santa arriving, leaving presents, and then leaving quickly with his eight reindeer (Rudolph wasn’t brought into common custom until the song “Rudolph the Red-nosed Reindeer” almost a hundred years later).

The story happens as follows:

1st Stanza shows children placing stockings near the fireplace.
2nd shows the children in their beds and ready to sleep.
3rd shows the speaker jumping out of bed and opening his curtains to see what was happening outside.
4th shows a sleigh and eight reindeer outside.
5th shows St. Nick for the first time.
6th has Santa shouting out the reindeer in his famous call of their names.
7th displays the sleigh flies to the top of the roof.
8th Santa goes down the chimney.
9th Santa is shown wearing his famous suit (fur at the time of writing) and with a sack of toys.
10th describes his facial features.
11th describes his body.
12th continues describing his body and calls him an “old elf”.
13th shows him do his work without speaking a single word.
14th has him finally say “Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good night!”(Continue reading…)

Christmas Poetry: “Christmas Imagined” by Gary R. Hess

“Christmas Imagined” is a poem by Gary R. Hess that was written to signify what the author truly wants for Christmas. It’s difficult, however, when the author lives in a different country, especially when there’s not even snow! But what can a man do except imagine what it would be like–like what it was before. Nonetheless, the time of youthful American Christmas spirit has passed and now he must look to the future for what he hopes will come again.

This poem is to show hope, splendor, and even amiss in our imagination throughout these glorious holidays.(Continue reading…)

Thanksgiving Poetry: “Thanksgiving Trifecta” by Gary R. Hess

Turkey

Thanksgiving is my favorite American holiday. Coming together as a family, talking about all the great things you are proud of or lucky to have, eating delicious food, and who can’t forget the beginning of Christmas season. This day is truly glorious.

I wrote this poem is a celebration of this great day and everything it stands for. I hope you enjoy it!(Continue reading…)