“I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” by William Wordsworth Poem and Analysis

Daffodils“I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” by William Wordsworth is a poem commonly known as “The Daffodils”. Let’s take a moment and go over a summary of the poem and then discuss it through a line-by-line analysis.

Summary

This poem is about the speaker who wanders throughout the land and comes upon a field of daffodils everywhere he goes. He feels great pleasure from it. Later, when the time has long gone, he thinks about the pleasure he felt while seeing it for the first time.

Analysis

Style: Four stanzas that are written in iambic tetra-meter with each stanza having the same rhyme scheme.
Theme: Being Alone
Tone: Joy
Rhyme scheme: ABABCC

Line-by-line Analysis and Figurative Language

    • I wandered lonely as a cloud / That floats on high o’er vales and hills, – The speaker walked around because he was lonely. Vales means valleys.
    • When all at once I saw a crowd, / A host, of golden daffodils; / Beside the lake, beneath the trees, / Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. – The speaker suddenly saw a field of daffodils moving in the wind.
    • Continuous as the stars that shine / And twinkle on the milky way, – Neverending
    • They stretched in never-ending line / Along the margin of a bay: – The went along the side of the bay.
    • Ten thousand saw I at a glance, / Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. – The speaker saw 10,000 with only a quick look. The daffodils swayed in the wind.
    • The waves beside them danced; but they / Out-did the sparkling waves in glee: – The waves were flowing yet the flowers moved more.
    • A poet could not but be gay, / In such a jocund company: – A poet can only be happy in such a happy place.
    • I gazed—and gazed—but little thought / What wealth the show to me had brought: – He looked but didn’t think. The scenery brought him great “wealth” – – joyfulness and memories.
    • For oft, when on my couch I lie / In vacant or in pensive mood, / They flash upon that inward eye / Which is the bliss of solitude; – Often times when the speaker is lying on his sofa alone, whether thinking deeply or without thought, the scenery of the daffodils comes to mind. And that is the happiness of being alone.
    • And then my heart with pleasure fills, / And dances with the daffodils. – after he thinks about the daffodils, he gets happy.

Poem: “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” by William Wordsworth

I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o’er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the milky way,
They stretched in never-ending line
Along the margin of a bay:
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

The waves beside them danced; but they
Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:
A poet could not but be gay,
In such a jocund company:
I gazed—and gazed—but little thought
What wealth the show to me had brought:

For oft, when on my couch I lie
In vacant or in pensive mood,
They flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.

Love Poetry: “Growth” by Gary R. Hess

Love poetry: Growth by Gary R Hess

“Growth” is a poem written for Valentine’s Day during the year 2018. Time has come and gone so quickly, and everything changes. There’s not much which can be said about the poem in terms of overall meaning. It speaks for itself. It is written in unrhymed meter.

Want to be romantic? Feel free to share this with your loved one. Write it on a card, print it out, or remember it and recite it during the perfect moment. Whatever you do, you can’t go wrong.(Continue reading…)

Christmas Poetry: “Christmas Imagined” by Gary R. Hess

“Christmas Imagined” is a poem by Gary R. Hess that was written to signify what the author truly wants for Christmas. It’s difficult, however, when the author lives in a different country, especially when there’s not even snow! But what can a man do except imagine what it would be like–like what it was before. Nonetheless, the time of youthful American Christmas spirit has passed and now he must look to the future for what he hopes will come again.

This poem is to show hope, splendor, and even amiss in our imagination throughout these glorious holidays.(Continue reading…)

The Eclipse – A Haiku by Gary R. Hess

“The Eclipse” is a poem to memorialize the total solar eclipse that occurred on August 21, 2017, across the United States. Sadly, I wasn’t able to view it as I’m half-way across the world. Nonetheless, it brought back great memories of when I was a child attempted to view an eclipse during elementary school. It was a great time and I look forward to being able to view the next one.(Continue reading…)

“The Tyger” by William Blake Analysis and Poem

Tiger

“The Tyger” by William Blake is often considered as one of the greatest poems ever written. In this article, we will take a look at Blake’s tiger through a brief synopsis of the writing, an analysis of the poem, a look at any figurative language used, and end with a reading of the writing.

Synopsis

“The Tyger” looks at what could create such a creature like a tiger. The poem takes a look at the different parts of the tiger’s body and the thing (God?) who created the subject.

(Continue reading…)

“Another Reason Why I Don’t Keep a Gun in the House” by Billy Collins Analysis and Poem

Let’s take a look at an “Another Reason Why I Don’t Keep a Gun in the House” by Billy Collins analysis. We will first look at a synopsis of the poem, then move to an explanation of it, and then talk about individual figurative language that occurs within the writing.

Synopsis

“Another Reason Why I Don’t Keep a Gun in the House” is the title of the poem, but unlike most writings, the phrase isn’t included in the entire poem. Instead, the title is meant as a way to show the readers his frustrations which may or may not be obvious to the reader from the writing.(Continue reading…)

“That Sure is My Little Dog” by Eleanor Lerman Analysis and Poem

Dog poem

“That Sure is My Little Dog” by Eleanor Lerman is seen as one of the greatest contemporary poems ever written. In this article, we will take a look at Lerman’s use of metaphors, vocabulary, and the true meaning of the poem through an inciteful analysis.

Synopsis

This poem is written in the voice of the author, speaking about moving on with life and letting the new generation take control. She carries her house on her like a bullet-proof shell and her dog is even wearing hard boots and has sharp jagged steel teeth that she uses to chomp on the “chains of fate”. But she wants to go now. Next, the author speaks about the differences between her generation and others. She mentions the Cuban Missile Crisis and how her generation is different than her parents. But now the world is “yours”. She wishes good luck and to “Have a nice day” sarcastically.

(Continue reading…)

“Mother to Son” by Langston Hughes Analysis and Poem

Mother and son

“Mother to Son” is perhaps Langston Hughes’ most famous poems. In this article, we will take a look at the meaning of the poem, analyze it, and then look at some different metaphors and phrases which may be confusing.

Synopsis

“Mother to Son” is a poem written from the point of view of a mother talking to her son. She begins by telling the son that life is not a crystal stair, that it has tacks and splinters, and all the boards are torn up and it doesn’t even have carpet in some places. The mother states that she has been climbing up the stairs and turning corners and how sometimes it goes dark but do not turn back. She says to keep climbing the stairs and that she is still climbing them herself.

(Continue reading…)

“Eating Poetry” by Mark Strand Analysis and Poem

Eating PoetryIn this article, we will take a look at a poem which many poets hold dear in their heart, “Eating Poetry” by Mark Strand. We will first look at a synopsis of “Eating Poetry” and then move onto an analysis before going into its figurative language.

Synopsis

“Eating Poetry” begins by the author eating poetry books. The ink is still dripping from the author’s mouth. The librarian can’t believe her eyes. The dogs are on the basement stairs and coming towards her. She stamps her feet and cries. The author then gets on his knees and licks her hand and celebrates his new found self.(Continue reading…)