Around the Web 07/31/16

Part of becoming a better poet is reading poetry and a lot of it. Today we take a look at what some other poets from around the web have to offer.

Poetry by E. Anton Gray: “Ode to Social Media” – This is probably the most accurate description of social media I have seen, and it is surely the best poem about social media I have read as well. It is written in ABAB rhyme.

tumbled dried” – A short but still yet sensual poem written by Singledust.

Beyond Words” – Kevin Brown takes a look at what love is and how we try to quantify it with needless words and actions.

If I Were Young Again” – The title says it all, really. Michael Lee Johnson takes a look at what he would do if he were a young lad, but what the title doesn’t state is that the author uses imagery to almost perfection.

Mad Love” – This is a look at love from bipolar quirky poet Nicole Moncada.

Meandering” – Gregory T. Janetka gives a unique look about what I consider life in general.

Releases

Mortal- Poetry book by Veronica Aldous – Veronica Aldous released a new poetry book titled “Mortal”. The book is released with the price of £9.99 and features poetry from a variety of genres.

Book Reviews

Book Review — Song of Myself: With a Complete Commentary – Evilcyclist takes a look at the beloved book by Walt Whitman.

The Poetry of Christina Strigas – Nick Trandahl gives praise to the Greek-Canadian poetess and her books.

Practicing this exercise will make you more confident in your creative work – Maja (Business in Rhyme) talks about how using our beliefs can help us be more confident have better results.

The 10 Greatest Love Poems Throughout History

The greatest love poems ever written is among one of the biggest controversies discussed by modern literature aficionados. What poem is the best? Which poet deserves the honor? Must the poet be among the most famous to be included on the list?

All of these questions are incredibly important and are discussed in depth within most poetry circles. The list below is not meant to stop any of these questions being asked, but instead add to the discussion. Which poems do you think deserve to be included in the list? Continue Reading

Over 50 Different Types of Poetry

Whether you are searching for a new type of poem to write or doing research for a critique, you will find this list quite useful and informative. I gathered a list of over fifty different types of poetry for your viewing pleasure. I will be adding to this list whenever I find something new.

ABC

Consists of five lines. Lines 1 to 4 are made up of words, phrases, or clauses with the first letter of each line in alphabetical order. Line 5 is one sentence long and may start with any letter.

Acrostic

Consists of any number of lines which spell a word or message. Usually the message is formed from the first letter of the phrase, but may be any letter. Continue Reading

What is Clerihew and Why Does it Matter?

I have mentioned Clerihew a few times on this blog and I even made an entire theme of Bright Dreams Journal of the genre, but what exactly is it and what does it accomplish?

First and foremost, yes, poetry has to accomplish something. It does not matter what. Entertainment, persuasion, and information are the most common. For Clerihew, entertainment is the most obvious choice. However, using Clerihew as a way to give information about people can also be a great way to help children remember important historical figures. Continue Reading

What You Need to Know to Comprehend Poetry

Understanding poetry is sometimes a difficult task, especially when you are new to the genre. Not to mention that when you are dealing with older poetry the more difficult it can be to uncover the true meaning of the writing. Nonetheless, the more we understand poetic elements, figures of speech, vocabulary, and sometimes the life or culture of the author, the better we will comprehend the poem.

Poetic elements are an extremely important part of poetry since poets use these elements to dictate the rhythm, structure, and meaning of the writing. Elements of poetry also serve as a tool for descriptions. Meter, cadence, rhyme, alliteration, assonance, consonance, repetition, and others are used quite often and are important to the emotions and interpretation of the reader. Readers should be able to identify an element and its purpose in that particular poem. Continue Reading

Sensory Use of Elements for Imagery in Poetry

Over the past thirty years, poets have begun putting much emphasis on imagery. This is not to say imagery wasn’t important in the past, look at haiku’s popularity. Nonetheless, imagery has expanded so much that it virtually is the poem. Poets have recently spent their entire writing describing actions, scenery, and objects. It’s an interesting phenomenon and has brought about great works of art in the process. These poets are known as “imagists.” However, you don’t need to be an imagist in order to use at least some imagery in poetry. Actually, all poems should have at least a minuscule. It may be added through similes, metaphors, simple to complex descriptions, personification, hyperbole, and use of concrete words. Continue Reading

Using Repetition in Poetry: Definitions and Purposes

Poetry is an art form, which can be created in a wide variety of ways. Most poetry styles have a unique pattern, which must be followed strictly. However, there are some forms that aren’t as strict and allow some leeway on what you can do. Using repetition allows you to reinforce ideas, add structure, create rhythm, create unity, and add additional emotion.

Different Types of Repetitions

First, let’s look at the different types of repetition used in poetry. Continue Reading

Poetry Writing Rubric: Middle School to College

Poetry Writing Rubric: Middle School to College

Poetry is a great tool for every English classroom. Whether you are a middle school, high school, college, or even an ESL teacher, it is a great activity for your students to express themselves and show their inner creativity.

When giving assignments, it is often necessary to have a rubric. These rubrics allow us to easily measure our students learning with impartiality.

Since poetry is an extremely objective form of literature, it is difficult to grade without a general picture of how to measure the learning development of the students. Continue Reading

An Outline for How to Write a Poetry Explication

Writing a poetry explication may sound like a difficult job, but it doesn’t have to be. As long as you explain the poem, there shouldn’t be too much to worry about. But how do we go about doing that?
Actually, there are many ways to analyze a poem. But I’ll go ahead and go through some basic steps to help you out.

To prepare

Step 1: Read a short biography about the author. This is so you can have a feel for what a poem may be referring to when you attempt to interpret it. Of course, this isn’t always a must. It depends on you or your teacher.

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20 Poetry Topics with Over 100 Poetry Writing Prompts

Sometimes we hit a brick-wall when brainstorming for our next poetry topic. When this happens, its good to have another person’s suggestions. These suggestions are often referred to as writing prompts. Below you’ll find a list of poetry prompts on a variety of subjects. Feel free to change them as much or as little as you’d like.

Poetry Writing Prompts

1. An elderly couple has been married for 50 years. Suddenly, the wife passes away.
2. What was the beauty of the ocean the first time you saw it?
3. What is the sound of your house at night during a rainstorm?
4. What was the feeling you had the first time you fell in love?
5. Describe the fly that buzzes around your head on a hot and humid summer afternoon.
6. What are your feelings when you watch the sunset with the person you care about most?
7. Describe the buzzing sound in your ears after a screech.
8. Describe the screech of the chalkboard.
9. Describe the feeling of longing for something you can’t have.

Continue Reading